No 3

I’ve created this page in hopes someone is looking for history on an antique sewing machine with only the name No. 3 written upon it.  Charles Raymond had produced a machine labeled No. 3 but, the number three is a lost sewing machine.  Lost: meaning we know the model exists but, no one has come forward with an example.

At one time, Raymond machines labelled No. 2 and No. 12 were lost.  These are rare models very few hold in their vintage sewing machine collection.  I had looked daily, asking collectors but also under every rock and webpage until, eventually, examples turned up.  Presently, I am still looking for the No. 3.  This model will carry the same appearance as the No. 2 you see in the photo below.  It will, however, be a degree larger.

Please study this photo of a No. 2 below.  If you think your machine has a 3 in place of the 2, please contact me.  I’d love to record the only known No. 3 to exist.

If your machine’s decoration is worn completely, note the two possible Raymond trademarks shown below. Either trademark is common in this era.  This trademark example is cast into the treadle iron stand.  If your machine has no decorative markings left, you may recognize the CR or the Beaver trademark on your machine.

Last, here is a page from a period brochure. The Raymond No. 3 machines, marketed towards tailors, did exist.

The Raymond No 3 was the largest of a family of four similar sewing machines.  Each one is larger than the last model.  These date primarily to the 1870s but the No 3, marketed for tailors, was made available into the 1890s until the No 12 model replaced it.

Next, I introduce you to Guelph’s local historian, Bonnie Durtnall.  I credit Bonnie for parts of my research as she’s never hesitated to help.  Her page has a wealth of history and I always learn each time I review her site.  Click to enter the page and enjoy Guelph labor history.

Finally, the Guelph Civic museum has a great archive but also a Raymond sewing machine collection. Consider visiting soon.